Redistricting

The basic purpose of redistricting is to equalize population among electoral districts when the Census indicates that a city or state’s population has increased or decreased in the last decade.

Greenville is a growing city. Its population increased 22 percent between 2010 and 2020.  The Constitution requires the City to redraw the lines that define the boundaries for the four City Council district seats.

This page, and the updates provided throughout the process, will ensure transparency during the process.

WHY ARE WE REDRAWING DISTRICT LINES?

The 2020 United States Census showed a shift in population density within the city limits, meaning districts are no longer balanced.

The law requires equity, so the City’s redistricting goal is to have four districts as close to the same number of people as possible.

WHO WILL DECIDE THE NEW BOUNDARIES?

City Council members will make final decisions with input from City residents and staff on how the new lines are drawn.

Throughout 2022, this page will be both a resource for updates on the process and a place where City residents will be able to provide feedback.

Current Districts

WHEN WILL NEW DISTRICTS BE CREATED?

In January 2022, City Council started the redistricting process by passing Resolution 2022-07.

In August, City Council will approve the process, including the timeline, to be used in the redistricting process.

In September and October, there will be a series of open forums where Greenville residents will have the opportunity to weigh in on the process.

In November, City staff will start creating a draft map using the public input and guidance from Council. There will then be a public forum to receive comments on the proposed map.

A map will be ready for final approval between mid-December and January 2023.

Council’s January resolution dictates the process should finish as far ahead of the March 2023 City Council filing deadline as possible. The next City election is in November 2023.

HOW WILL THE NEW MAP BE CREATED?

Per City Council’s January resolution, the newly drawn map will:

  • Meet the requirement of “one person, one vote” under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment
  • Comply with the Voting Rights Act, primarily Section 2, which protects the interest of the racial minority population
  • Have contiguous districts
  • Minimize the division of voting precincts
  • Be geographically compact
  • Follow existing districts and communities as much as possible
  • Comply with all other applicable court decisions and federal and State laws

HOW CAN WE BE SURE IT IS FAIR?

The Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice is responsible for enforcement of provisions of the Voting Rights Act that seek to ensure that redistricting plans do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, or membership in a protected language minority group. The City of Greenville is working with attorneys who are experienced in redistricting law to ensure our process is equitable and transparent.